Hello friends 👋

It’s another peaceful weekend for me here. Thanks so much to those of you who filled out the content improvement survey that was sent out last week. I understand how busy you are, so I really appreciate it. I got many responses so far with super helpful feedback. Thanks again for doing this!

In this issue…

Theme: Modern Font of the Week: Daubenton  Design Idea of the Week: Dynamic Diagonals Color Inspirations: Suprematism

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{img: sample of Daubenton}

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Font of the Week

All About Daubenton

Typeface designers like to visit old cemeteries for inspiration. Morbid much? No surprise, this peculiar behavior is for academic purposes. It is a treasure hunt to find historical letterforms with unique combinations of formality and funk.

We first talked about engraving in our Piazzola issue. Though the history of engraving can be traced back to earlier times, Roman inscription lettering has a significant influence on the development of modern typefaces. The letter outlines were first painted onto the stone, and then the stone carver followed the brush marks. The flares carvers made at the end of the stroke and corners became the serifs you see now.

Daubenton, named after the first director of the Natural History Museum in Paris, is inspired by the engraved letters found in the Museum. The construction of Daubenton tells us that the inspiration was a traditional serif with a natural, calligraphic touch. The designer upgraded this traditional sensibility by decreasing the contrast in the strokes and exaggerating the geometric aspect of the letters. This resulted in an eclectic style that communicates modernity and elevation.

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{img: left– Daubenton; right–Daubenton’s gravestone in the gardens of the Museum of Natural History in Paris, France; source: Wikipedia}

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